How To Melt White Chocolate For Dipping Using Basic Tools

Sweet tooth runs in the family and chocolates are my main go-to food whenever I felt the need to indulge my taste buds. I love my bread sticks dipped in white chocolate because of its distinct creaminess and sweetness!

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Technically, white chocolate is not a chocolate because it does not have chocolate solids. You can throw a bar into the microwave and let it melt to achieve an oozing goodness that you can use in so many ways.

During baking, it can serve as an amazing addition to cake decorations, glaze, coating and as an indulgent filling. Compared to dark chocolates, the white chocolate is made out of cocoa butter, lecithin, which is an animal derived fatty substance, sugar, vanilla and milk products. This combination of ingredients makes the white chocolate a bit harder to melt.

Melting chocolate can sometimes be a mess, especially for beginners. Without knowing the proper techniques, you might end up with messy melted chocolate with numerous lumps in it.

What You Will Need:

  • Microwave and a bowl: Melting white chocolate using a microwave is easy but is less commonly used by chefs. The downside of this is you cannot just leave your chocolate in it. There is a high risk of burning your chocolate while using a microwave. It is more tedious as you will have to melt it in small intervals with regular stirring in between.
  • Double-boiler on a stove: You can place a double-boiler on a stove and melt your chocolates in it. You will have to use a few inches of water depending on the size of your double-boiler to create a bath. However, with the double-boiler, you will not be able to see when the water starts to simmer which can be a recipe for disaster.
  • Skillet and bowl on a stove: This is a great alternative for the double-boiler and is known as the water bath method. With this, you will need a skillet and a bowl. My wide skillet is one of my priced possessions along with my masticating juicer that I used for my other recipes.                                                                                            Your bowl should preferably be made out of stainless steel or glass. This is commonly used and I also prefer this method as this lets you see all the action! You will be able to know once the water simmers so you can turn off your flame and avoid burning your chocolate.                                                                                                 Once it simmers and the flame is off, you can just leave it until the chocolate melts completely. This is the easiest method to keep an eye on your procedure.

Melting Chocolate Using A Microwave

Prepare:

Start by cutting your white chocolate into small bars and place these into a microwave-safe bowl. The bowl should be wide and shallow enough to accommodate the chocolate especially when it starts melting.

Microwave:

Never put your microwave on high unless you want charcoaled chocolates. Place your microwave on its 50% or medium high. Let your bowl with chocolates sit in there for about 30 seconds to one minute.

Stir:

The result may be different depending on your microwave. However, when your chocolate starts melting, remove it from the microwave and start stirring.

Continue Heating:

Once you have done your initial stir, continue heating your chocolates on medium heat with a 15 to 30 second interval up until you get a smooth and creamy consistency. If you find any small lumps, you can let it melt out of the remaining heat.

Melting Chocolate Using A Double Boiler On A Stove

This is commonly used by most chefs. The burning point of white chocolate is very low which is around 44 degrees Celsius so you will need a full control in temperature for your melting procedure to go through.

Filling With Water:

Start by filling your double-boiler with approximately one inch of water. You want to make sure that there is enough space between the water and the boiler's top half. You can test this by placing the top half of the boiler and wait until the water starts boiling. After half a minute, remove it and check if there are any water splashes.

Boiling:

You can then set the fire on medium high. Wait until the water starts to boil. Make sure that the top half of your boiler does not touch the water even while it is boiling.

Melting Chocolate Using A Skillet

A great alternative for a double-boiler is a skillet paired with a metal or glass bowl also known as the water bath method.

Preparing Your Skillet:

Choose a wide skillet and fill it with around an inch of water. Cut your white chocolates into mini bars and place them in a shallow bowl that is heatproof, preferably a tempered glass or stainless.

You can then place the bowl in the skillet and it is completely okay to let the bowl touch the water directly. It is good to know that the steam inside a double-boiler has a higher temperature compared to the water in this skillet so it is actually more gentle for your chocolates.

Boiling:

Bring the water to boil and once it starts to simmer, just turn your flame off and let your chocolate melt on its own.

Conclusion:

Achieving the perfect melted white chocolate is easy once you find the best method that works for you. Though I personally prefer using my good old skillet and my glass bowl, you are free to do some kitchen experiment and decide after that.

What is important to remember is that whatever method you end up using, your chocolate can still burn if you don't keep an eye on it during the procedure.

I hope these simple tips helped you to kick start your chocolaty ventures. Once again, if you have any questions or concerns, just leave them in the comment section below. Don't forget to share this article with your friends and family.

Jenny Hopper
 

My name is Jenny Hopper, I’m a mother of two cute little kids. To tell you, blogging isn’t an easy task. But for me, I feel rewarded for doing the things that I love and one is sharing my experiences with the world and with you. And I definitely welcome any helpful and sincere contribution from you.

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